Tag Archives: population

Glossary: Population and Personalised Care

This Glossary is about Population and Personalised Care the latter being  a style of clinical and general management which always considers the patients’ perspective as the most important and is committed to increasing patient Engagement, Empowerment or Involvement, which may be regarded as synonyms. Personalised care is an element of patient centred care and is the other side of the coin from population care. This is a diffuse and fast moving field with language evolving at a rapid rate. Here are the key terms and concepts.

  • Value “What is gained relative to what we give up – the benefit relative to the cost but not only to the direct cost, which is the efficiency of a service, but the Opportunity Cost, or the Opportunity Lost to put it another way and there are three dimensions to value in healthcare
    • o Allocative value, determined by how the assets are distributed to different sub groups in the population
    • o Technical value, determined by how well resources are used for all the people in need in the population
    • o Personalised value, determined by how well the decisions relate to the values of each individual

Waste is any activity in a process that consumes resources without adding value for the patient

Cost effectiveness

The relationship between the cost of an intervention and its impact.

Optimality;

Optimality is reached when resources or productivity create maximal benefit with the least harm. Beyond optimality there is overuse.

Programme Budgeting and Marginal Analysis;

The fundamental idea behind programme budgeting is decision making based on explicit criteria related to the wellbeing of the whole population, as opposed to decision making by compromise among various institutional, parochial, or other vested interests. Marginal Analysis consists of starting with a particular mix of services and analyzing changes in that mix. If resources can be shifted to produce greater benefit then this should be done.

Opportunity Cost;

The value of the next best alternative forgone as a result of the decision made.

Equity;

Equity is a subjective judgment of unfairness.

  • System – A set of activities with a common set of objectives with an annual report.
  • o Network – If a system is a set of activities with a common set of objectives, the network is the set of organizations and individuals that deliver the systems.
  • o Pathway – The actual care process of care experienced by each individual patient/client; also described as maps that define best practice.
  • o Quality -The degree to which a service meets preset standards of goodness in the delivery of the system’s objectives.
  • Culture – “Culture is the shared assumptions of a group that is has learned in coping with external tasks and dealing with internal relationships. Akey cultural issue is the development of a culture of stewardship.
  • Population healthcare –the design and delivery of the care with a primary focus on the population in need, not the healthcare institutions, where the populations in need are defined not bureaucratically but by the optimum population size for high value care for individuals and the group in need Population medicine or population clinical practice – a style of practise in which the clinician feels, and is given responsibility for, all of the people in the population in need whether or not they have been referred
  • Personalised Care or Personalised Medicine  –  the tailoring of care to take into account each individual’ s unique  needs, preferences and values. The term has become popularised recently to describe clinical decision making in the era of the genome but another term for clinical decision making incorporating genomic information is
    • o Stratified Medicine – decision making based on the patients degree of risk, including risk suggested by genomics and based on the long standing practice of risk stratification of elderly people based on social and medical, but not genomic characteristics
    • o Precision Medicine decision making taking into account genomic information either in diagnosis – ‘molecular diagnostics’ –or choice of drug treatment –‘pharmacogenomics’.
  • Principal and Agent – legally the patient is the principal, the clinician the agent, even if there is no money involved. Some people feel the shift in the balance of power occurred with the founding of the NHS when the patient was not charged for consulting the GP. The pendulum swung further because of
    • o Information Asymmetry – the fact that the clinician has, until the advent of the Internet much more technical knowledge
    • o Trust – Faith in another to perform a task that is not in the other’s interest
    • o Autonomy – Freedom to make decisions or act without reference to others
    • o Informed Consent – Consent to treatment given with full understanding of the magnitude and probabilities of the good and adverse outcomes
  • Empathy – In his book on Emotional Intelligence Daniel Goldman identifies three types of empathy – cognitive empathy is the ability to understand what another person is thinking   Emotional empathy is the ability to feel what another person is feeling. Empathic concern is the ability to sense what another person needs for you.
  • Evidence and Value based decision making – Decision making that ensures the patient is fully informed about the strength of evidence about the probability and magnitude of both risks and benefits of the options being considered and that the patient has been helped to reflect on, clarify and express their preferences based on the value they place on the possible benefit, the possible harm and on the risk they are taking.
    • o Health Literacy – The cognitive and social skills which determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access to, understand and use information. The term Statistical literacy – the ability to understand and communicate probabilities which is shared by both patients and clinicians, sometimes called risk literacy is increasingly used
    • o Framing –  the conscious or unconscious presentation of data in ways that influence their interpretation and decision making
    • o Shared Decision Making – is a style of decision making in which clinicians and patients are both involved
    • o Preference Sensitive Decision Making – is a style of decision making in which the patient’s preferences are explicitly elicited, to avoid
    • o Silent Misdiagnosis – namely failure to diagnose accurately the patient’s values and preferences even though their disease has been correctly diagnosed
    • o Informed Consent
    • o Patient Decision Aids – a tool to support the patient during decision making, particularly before and after the face to face consultation and they are increasingly  delivered using digital means variously called eHealth, mHealth, digital health or Telemedicine which may be regarded as synonyms
  • Patient defined and reported outcomes are objective measures using validated tools

subjective measures of outcome, including the degree to which the treatment addressed the problem that was bothering the patient most, rather than their diagnosis and the patient’s experience.

Necessary, Appropriate, Inappropriate or Futile Classification of interventions based on the probabilities of benefit and harm

Burden of Treatment – the impact of the process of care on the affected individual and their carers

Personal Value in Healthcare

Personal Value in Healthcare: the delivery of services informed by what matters to the individual.

Patient Centered Care

The term personalisation is used increasingly and, as a consequence, has developed an increasing number of meanings.

One of the earliest uses was in the definition of Evidence Based Medicine. Although accused of being cook book medicine, the origination of Evidence Based Medicine emphasised the need to relate the evidence to the unique clinical condition to the individual patient and his/her values:

Evidence based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. The practice of evidence based medicine means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research. By individual clinical expertise we mean the proficiency and judgment that individual clinicians acquire through clinical experience and clinical practice. Increased expertise is reflected in many ways, but especially in more effective and efficient diagnosis and in the more thoughtful identification and compassionate use of individual patients’ predicaments, rights, and preferences in making clinical decisions about their care.

Source: Sackett, D. L., Rosenberg, W.M.C., Gray, J.A.M., Haynes, R.B., Richardson, W.S. Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn’t. BMJ 312 (p.71).

The model described is perhaps better illustrated as a diagram:

Patient Centered Care

This emphasises the need to take into account patients and their values to effectively deliver patient centered care. In some ways the term personalized medicine or personalized care is analogous to the concept of customisation in industry, made famous by Toyota and Dell Computers, and more recently, by the Mini factory in Oxford.

Customisation uses the benefits of large-scale construction when it makes sense but then customises the products to suit the needs of the individual. More recently the term personalisation has been associated with the use of genomic information as though it were a new term, but genomic information is not qualitatively different from biochemical information.  It is just information that needs to be tailored to the individual and should make the treatment specific to the unique clinical problems of that individual.

Other terms that have been used to describe how medicine will be practised when genomic information is available are the terms ‘precision medicine’ and ‘stratified medicine’ but the term personalised is probably now the most commonly used term.

It is important to remember that personalisation is just as important whether there is no genomic information available, as when there is genomic information available.